Title

Indigenous protagonism in tourism operations and management in Australia, Brazil, and New Zealand

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Borges de Lima, I & Weiler, B 2015, 'Indigenous protagonism in tourism operations and management in Australia, Brazil, and New Zealand', CMUJ of Social Sciences and Humanities, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-31.

Published version available from:

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Worldwide, Indigenous tourism has grown in importance over the last few decades, thus placing peoples, their territory, culture, customs, views of the world, and natural environments at the center of attention of an array of Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations and governments. Australia, Brazil, and New Zealand are home to many Indigenous communities, and this paper aims to identify the key elements related to the contemporary role of indigenous groups and communities in tourism operations and management in the context of these countries. Desktop research for this study included a review of academic and grey literature, secondary data, and the authors’ collective experience in the field. Current approaches to indigenous tourism suggest that engagement of ethnic indigenous minorities in a leadership, and even a protagonist role, is good for sustainable tourism operations and management, particularly if they incorporate self-determination, control, and empowerment.