Title

Comparison of career patterns of male and female graduates of one Australian medical school

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Cameron, R, Redman, S, Burrows, S & Young B1995, 'Comparison of career patterns of male and female graduates of one Australian medical school', Teaching and Learning in Medicine, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 218-224.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10401339509539747

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Although the proportion of women graduating from Australian medical schools has increased markedly in recent years, female doctors fall behind their male peers in progression in postgraduate training and select different career options. The graduates (1982–1988) of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Newcastle, New South Wales were surveyed by a self‐complete questionnaire, examining measures of career progression and factors influencing career choice with particular reference to gender.

No gender differences were found in age, graduation with honors, years from graduation, or marital status. Significant gender differences were found in postgraduate qualifications, likelihood of occupying a specialty training position, likelihood of training in a specialty other than general practice, hours worked, likelihood of gender/child care considerations influencing career choice, and income.

The career progression and choice of specialty of female doctors is influenced by gender considerations and child care responsibilities to afar greater degree than are the career progression and choice of specialty of their male counterparts.