Title

Temporal overlap of humans and giant lizards (Varanidae; Squamata) in Pleistocene Australia

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Price, GJ, Louys, J, Cramb, J, Feng, Y, Zhao, J, Hocknull, SA, Webb, GE, Nguyen, AD & Joannes-Boyau, R 2015, 'Temporal overlap of humans and giant lizards (Varanidae; Squamata) in Pleistocene Australia', Quaternary Science Reviews, vol. 125, pp. 98-105.

Published version available from:

http://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2015.08.013

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

An obvious but key prerequisite to testing hypotheses concerning the role of humans in the extinction of late Quaternary ‘megafauna’ is demonstrating that humans and the extinct taxa overlapped, both temporally and spatially. In many regions, a paucity of reliably dated fossil occurrences of megafauna makes it challenging, if not impossible, to test many of the leading extinction hypotheses. The giant monitor lizards of Australia are a case in point. Despite commonly being argued to have suffered extinction at the hands of the first human colonisers (who arrived by 50 ka), it has never been reliably demonstrated that giant monitors and humans temporally overlapped in Australia. Here we present the results of an integrated U–Th and 14C dating study of a late Pleistocene fossil deposit that has yielded the youngest dated remains of giant monitor lizards in Australia. The site, Colosseum Chamber, is a cave deposit in the Mt Etna region, central eastern Australia. Sixteen new dates were generated and demonstrate that the bulk of the material in the deposit accumulated since ca. 50 ka. The new monitor fossil is, minimally, 30 ky younger than the previous youngest reliably dated record for giant lizards in Australia and for the first time, demonstrates that on a continental scale, humans and giant lizards overlapped in time. The new record brings the existing geochronological dataset for Australian giant monitor lizards to seven dated occurrences. With such sparse data, we are hesitant to argue that our new date represents the time of their extinction from the continent. Rather, we suspect that future fossil collecting will yield new samples both older and younger than 50 ka. Nevertheless, we unequivocally demonstrate that humans and giant monitor lizards overlapped temporally in Australia, and thus, humans can only now be considered potential drivers for their extinction.