Title

The evaluation of an intervention to prevent the early introduction of solids to babies

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Nancarrow, S 2003, 'The evaluation of an intervention to prevent the early introduction of solids to babies', Practice Development in Health Care, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 148-155.

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Aim: To report on the evaluation of a nutrition intervention that was designed to prevent the early introduction of solids to infants and to ensure food texture and variety were age appropriate.
Method: A "Nutrition Screening Tool", was administered to consecutive parents for three months by Maternal and Child Health nurses (MACH) at the two and six-month immunisation schedules. At the two-month immunisation, parents were asked to predict the age at which they proposed to introduce solids to their child and discus the factors that influenced their decision making. At the six-month immunisation schedule, parents were asked to report the actual age at which they introduced solids to their child.
Results: More than 85% of parents reported that they actually, or intended to introduce solids after their baby is four months of age. There was no relationship between the age of introduction of solids and the source or number of information materials received or the birth order of the child (p>0.05).
Conclusion: Parents in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) already have high rates of adherence to existing guidelines for the introduction of solid food to infants. The timing of a nutritional intervention to coincide with the six-month immunisation schedules was not optimal for this population.