Title

An exploratory study of staff nurses’ knowledge of delirium in the medical ICU: an Asian perspective

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Christensen, M 2014 , 'An exploratory study of staff nurses’ knowledge of delirium in the medical ICU: an Asian perspective', Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 54-60.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2013.08.004

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to establish intensive care unit nurses’ knowledge of delirium within an acute tertiary hospital within South East Asia.

Background: Delirium is a common, life threatening and often preventable cause of morbidity and mortality among older patients. Undetected and untreated delirium is a catalyst to increased mortality, morbidity, functional decline and results in increased requirement for nursing care, healthcare expense and hospital length of stay. However, despite effective assessment tools to identify delirium in the acute setting, there still remains an inability of ICU nurses’ to accurately identify delirium in the critically ill patient especially that of hypoactive delirium.

Method: A purposive sample of 53 staff nurses from a 13-bedded medical intensive care unit within an acute tertiary teaching hospital in South East Asia were asked to participate. A 40 item 5-point Likert scale questionnaire was employed to determine the participants’ knowledge of the signs and symptoms; the risk factors and negative outcomes of delirium.

Results: The overall positively answered mean score was 27 (67.3%) out of a possible 40 questions. Mean scores for knowledge of signs and symptoms, risk factors and negative outcomes were 9.52 (63.5%, n = 15), 11.43 (63.5%, n = 17) and 6.0 (75%, n = 8), respectively.

Conclusion: Whilst the results of this study are similar to others taken from a western perspective, it appeared that the ICU nurses in this study demonstrated limited knowledge of the signs and symptoms, risk factors and negative outcomes of delirium in the critically patient. The implications for practice of this are important given the outcomes of untreated delirium.