Title

Is food and nutrition knowledge the proof in the pudding?: the Jamie Oliver effect

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Muggleston, H 2010, 'Is food and nutrition knowledge the proof in the pudding?: the Jamie Oliver effect ', Text, vol. 9, Special Issue.

Article available on Open Access

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

The cliché, ‘The proof is in the pudding’ is a shortened version of the original phrase ‘the proof of the pudding is in the eating’. It means that the true value or quality of something can only be judged when put to use; results are what count. In this regard ‘the pudding’ can be represented by nutrition knowledge (i.e. information) and the ‘proof of the eating’ as the influence or effectiveness of how this knowledge is applied. As this paper will show, food and nutrition knowledge has the potential to affect eating behaviour, health and the food supply, and it is the process in which knowledge is communicated that is of relevance to this discourse. Mass media can profoundly shape our perceptions about the world, including attitudes towards how we feel about food and nutrition, what we eat and drink, and consequently, our health. Popular entertainment, such as television, provides an ideal vehicle for sharing health information and influencing behaviour. This paper explores how Jamie Oliver, a media celebrity, is using mass media to affect the food supply and promote healthier eating practices.