Title

Shortage of supported housing for people with mental illness: Australia as an exemplar of an international problem

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Cashin, A 2014, 'Shortage of supported housing for people with mental illness: Australia as an exemplar of an international problem', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 148-151.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/01612840.2013.827287

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Social and economic stability promotes recovery and treatment maintenance in people with mental disorders. Research findings are strong that there is a link between economic and housing stability and relapse. To achieve social and economic stability a whole of government approach is required. Policy is not a linear process but rather is an interactive and iterative process in which administrative discretion comes to bare. Demarcations and tensions in terms of interpretation of policy among departments are international phenomena. In Australia, issues exist in the government interdepartmental interpretation of disability that discriminates against those without intellectual disability in securing supported housing. This issue is a good exemplar of the challenges of a whole of government approach to support those with psychiatric disability. The example is of particular concern in light of housing affordability in Australia. The issue is contemporary as Australia rolls out the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and struggles to fulfil a commitment to a whole of government approach to care and support for people with a psychiatric disability. Internationally the issue is timely as more countries embrace the philosophy of a whole of government approach to mental health care.