Title

Are single-session smoking cessation groups a feasible option for rural Australia? – Outcomes from a pilot study

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Gould, GS & Watters, T 2015, 'Are single-session smoking cessation groups a feasible option for rural Australia? – Outcomes from a pilot study', Journal of Smoking Cessation, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 135-140.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jsc.2014.4

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Introduction: Single-session group smoking cessation interventions have received little attention in the literature. Aims: This study aimed to test the feasibility and outcomes of a single-session large group smoking cessation intervention in a rural area of New South Wales. Methods: Participants from a smoking cessation course (N = 42) were asked about cigarette consumption, quit attempts, and readiness and confidence to quit at registration and six months. The two-hour intervention occurred in a group setting and comprised of cognitive behaviour therapy and pharmacotherapy advice. Results: The analysis revealed a 26.2% (N = 11) quit rate based on self-report and/or carbon monoxide validation at 6 months (intention to treat). Those who quit all used pharmacotherapy: eight (73%) Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT); two (18%) varenicline and one (9%) bupropion with NRT. Seven people (17%) used medicines to reduce consumption of cigarettes. A paired samples t test of those still smoking showed a statistically significant decrease in the numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (p<.001). Conclusion: The quit rate of 26.2% from this large single-session smoking cessation course is comparable to that expected from groups having multiple sessions. As a pilot study, these data suggest that a multi-faceted single-session two-hour smoking cessation intervention can successfully support quit attempts in a rural location.