Title

Significantly higher faecal counts of the yeasts candida and saccharomyces identified in people with coeliac disease

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Hartnett, J, Myers, SP & Rolfe, M 2017, 'Significantly higher faecal counts of the yeasts candida and saccharomyces identified in people with coeliac disease', Gut Pathogens, vol. 9, no. 26.

Article available on Open Access

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disorder resulting from an interaction between diet, genome and immunity. The treatment of CoeD is lifelong adherence to a gluten free diet, which is associated with clinical and histological improvements. However, a substantive number of individuals report only partial symptom improvement despite both compliance with a strict gluten free diet and improvements in serological and histological biomarkers of disease activity. The role of the intestinal microbiota is an area of interest in this sub-group.

AIMS: To investigate the role of yeasts and parasites in individuals reporting persistent symptoms of Coeliac disease (CoeD).

METHODS: Forty-five people who met the ESPGHAN diagnostic criteria for CoeD were recruited via the Australian Coeliac Association. The faecal measures of the DNA of yeasts and parasites from the CoeD group were compared to data obtained from the medical records of non-coeliac controls with gastrointestinal symptoms from other causes.

RESULTS: Candida sp. was detected in 33% of the CoeD group compared 0% of the control group (p = 0.000) and Saccharomyces sp. was detected in 33% of the CoeD group compared to 10% of the control group (p = 0.026). There were no differences in the presence of any of the parasite species measured.

CONCLUSION: Further research is required to understand the significance of Candida and Saccharomyces species in both the aetiology of CoeD and of persistent symptoms in this sub-group. Trial Registration Clinical Trial Registration-ANZCTR Number: 12610000630011.