Title

Self-reported skin cancer protection strategies and location of skin cancer in retired cricketers: a case study from the membership of the Emu Cricket Club

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Noble-Jerks, J, Weatherby, RP & Meir, RA 2006, 'Self-reported skin cancer protection strategies and location of skin cancer in retired cricketers: a case study from the membership of the Emu Cricket Club', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 441-445.

journal home page available at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/707423

Publisher's version of article available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2006.05.027

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Cricket is one of Australia's most popular sports with approximately 470,000 registered participants. Played as a summer sport, participants can spend long periods in the sun with potential skin damage a possible contributor to skin cancer. Three hundred and sixty-eight retired regional representative players received and were invited to complete a comprehensive survey that included questions relating to their individual playing history, injury rate, sun protection strategies and reported location of skin cancer. A total of 164 players (mean age 45.2 ± 12.1 years) responded to the survey representing a response rate of 44.6%. Of these, 61.6% reported no diagnosis of skin cancer. However, 38.4% had been diagnosed with at least one skin cancer with the most common site being the face followed by the arms. Of those respondents reporting the diagnosis of a skin cancer, 7.9% had skin cancer on 4 or more separate locations. Proportionally, the 45–55 years group had the highest incidence, with 55.8% of this group indicating they had a skin cancer in at least one anatomical location. By comparison those in the under 35 years age group reported an incidence rate of 16.7%. The incidence of skin cancer among respondents (n = 63) reporting either, occasionally, very rarely or never wearing sunscreen, a hat or long sleeved shirt was (n = 27) 42.9, (n = 14) 22.2 and (n = 39) 61.9%, respectively. The results suggest that skin protection strategies, such as wearing a wide brimmed hat, long sleeved shirt and the use of sunscreen, may help to reduce the risk of skin cancer in cricketers.