Title

A preliminary investigation into the long-term injury consequences reported by retired baseball players

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Meir, RA, Weatherby, RP & Rolfe, MI 2007, 'A preliminary investigation into the long-term injury consequences reported by retired baseball players', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 187-190.

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sporthome page available at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/707423

Publisher's version of article available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2006.06.002

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Seventy-five retired baseball players participated in a survey (37.8% response rate) in order to establish the long-term consequences of injuries sustained during their playing careers. Respondents had a mean age of 55.8 (±11.4) years with a mean age of 41.3 (±11.4) years at retirement from play. The mean overall rate of injury suffered per player/playing career was 5.6 (±7.1). 54.7% of respondents experienced a major injury (i.e. injury resulting in 5 or more consecutive weeks absence from training and play) with a mean major injury per player/playing career of 1.5 (±2.2). The rate for significant injuries (i.e. injury resulting in more than 1 week but less than 5 weeks absence from training and play) was 4.1 (±6.5) per player/playing career. Catchers had significantly less injuries than all other positions (p = 0.027). 18.7% of all respondents reported suffering from arthritis, 24% from restricted joint mobility and 4% from chronically stiff fingers; all of these conditions were associated with their participation in baseball based on medical examination by their GP or medical specialist. 29.3% of respondents indicated that they had incurred additional medical costs and 12% reported significant loss of income associated with their injuries. Some injuries were severe enough that they resulted in extended stays in hospital producing costs carried by the health care system.