Title

Evidence of altered lumbo-pelvic muscle recruitment in the presence of posterior pelvic pain and failed load transfer through the pelvis

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Hungerford, BA, Gilleard, WL & Hodges, P 2003, 'Evidence of altered lumbo-pelvic muscle recruitment in the presence of posterior pelvic pain and failed load transfer through the pelvis', Spine, vol. 28, no. 14, pp. 1593-1600.

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Study Design. Cross-sectional study of electromyographic onsets of trunk and hip muscles in subjects with a clinical diagnosis of sacroiliac joint pain and matched control subjects. Objectives. To determine whether muscle activation of the supporting leg was different between control subjects and subjects with sacroiliac joint pain during hip flexion in standing. Background. Activation of the trunk and gluteal muscles stabilize the pelvis for load transference; however, the temporal pattern of muscle activation and the effect of pelvic pain on temporal parameters has not been investigated. Methods. Fourteen men with a clinical diagnosis of sacroiliac joint pain and healthy age-matched control subjects were studied. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded from seven trunk and hip muscles of the supporting leg during hip flexion in standing. Onset of muscle activity relative to initiation of the task was compared between groups and between limbs. Results. The onset of obliquus internus abdominis (OI) and multifidus occurred before initiation of weight transfer in the control subjects. The onset of obliquus internus abdominis, multifidus, and gluteus maximus was delayed on the symptomatic side in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain compared with control subjects, and the onset of biceps femoris electromyographic activity was earlier. In addition, electromyographic onsets were different between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain. Conclusions. The delayed onset of obliquus internus abdominis, multifidus, and gluteus maximus electromyographic activity of the supporting leg during hip flexion, in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain, suggests an alteration in the strategy for lumbopelvic stabilization that may disrupt load transference through the pelvis.

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