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Abstract

In furthering the process of codifying international agreements into a body of international development law and established principles, this article creates an indicator for social scientists, practitioners and the public to use in measuring whether international organisations and governments meet the criteria for development that have been established by various international treaties and that are recognised by experts in the field. Though the concept of human and social development presented in international treaties actually reflects diverse dimensions of humanity offered by psychologists (human development potential), anthropologists (cultural adaptation and diversity along non-linear paths), artists and others (expression, co-existence with nature, ideas of beauty, and intellectual discovery), few, if any, today in the development field appear to pay any attention to these broader views. International development as defined both by its proponents (mostly economists and technicians) and by its critics (often political interest groups in urban societies) is now largely a linear measure along a ladder, applying a single dimensional measure of productivity and the physical (animal) benefits it can provide. This article re-establishes the international community’s comprehensive human vision that has been co-opted.

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