Title

The impact of extracurricular roles on retention: a social exchange theory perspective

Document Type

Presentation

Publication details

Horstmanshof, L & Zimitat, C 2003, 'The impact of extracurricular roles on retention: a social exchange theory perspective', paper presented to Enhancing transition to higher education: strategies and policies that work: seventh Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld., 9-11 July.

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

The first year experiences of full-time students not in paid employment (Group 1, n=576), full-time students in full-time paid employment with some family/carer responsibilities (Group 2, n=298), and full-time students in full-time paid employment who are primary income earners and primary carers in their household (Group 3, n=63) are significantly different in several respects. There were no differences in perceptions of teaching and learning, first semester grades or frequency of use of technologies. Group 2 students (compared with Group 1 and 3 students) spend less time on campus, find less interest and value in lectures, have more difficulty with motivation to study, spend less time preparing for and attending scheduled teaching activities and are significantly more likely to consider leaving study. Group 3 students reported significantly stronger motivation and higher levels of home access to websites that they considered as essential learning resources.

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