Title

The effect of depression and perceived skill on anticipated emotions and persistence in off-course betting

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Rae, D & Haw, J 2005, 'The effect of depression and perceived skill on anticipated emotions and persistence in off-course betting', International Gambling Studies, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 199-208.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14459790500303386

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

This study examined the effects of prior depression and perceived skill on anticipated emotions within a session of gambling. The sample consisted of 93 male participants, collected from various off-course gambling venues around the Western Sydney districts of NSW. Participants completed a questionnaire consisting of the depression anxiety and stress scale and the gambling beliefs section of the Maroondah assessment profile for problem gamblers. Emotions were measured using a series of visual analogue scales. Results indicated significant differences in anticipated emotions according to scenario. Perceived skill resulted in higher levels of negative anticipated emotions in losing scenarios only and emotions did not predict persistence within a session of gambling. The implications of this research are discussed, along with recommendations for future research.