Title

Sea-changers and downshifters and the Australian tourism and hospitality industry: some possible effects

Document Type

Conference publication

Publication details

Cairncross, G & Buultjens, J 2005, ‘Sea-changers and downshifters and the Australian tourism and hospitality industry: some possible effects’, in P Tremblay & A Boyle (eds), Proceedings of Sharing Tourism Knowledge: Council of Australian University Tourism and Hospitality Educators (CAUTHE) Annual Conference, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, 1-5 February, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT.

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

An increasing number of Australian’s are opting out of the ‘rat-race’. They either do this by downshifting, that is, working less or taking a lower paying job and/or by making a ‘seachange’, that is, physically moving to a regional area for lifestyle reasons. Almost one quarter of all Australians between 30 and 60 years in age are downshifters. This paper presents results from an explorative study of twelve people who have made the seachange by moving to Coffs Harbour on the Mid-North Coast of New South Wales. The study establishes that these seachangers are also downshifters. The ‘seachanging-downshifters’ studied have mostly been happy with their new lifestyle and nearly all have signalled that one way they spend less is by taking fewer holidays and dining out in cheaper eating establishments. This paper considers the consequences of these findings for the tourism and hospitality industry.

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