Title

A randomised control trial investigating the efficacy of interactive, motion capture-based rehabilitation in an inpatient stroke population

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Tyson, A, Cannell, J, Moles, E, Lane, K, Ahuja, K, Smith, S, Callisaya, M & Bird, ML 2017, 'A randomised control trial investigating the efficacy of interactive, motion capture-based rehabilitation in an inpatient stroke population', Abstracts presented at the SMART STROKES 2017 Conference, Gold Coast, QLD, 10-11 August, 2017, International Journal of Stroke, vol. 12, no. 2 suppl.

Published version available from:

https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1747493017714154

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Background: Implementation of technology in stroke rehabilitation is limited despite some evidence supporting efficacy, partly due to the variety of devices and software available and rapid evolution of new technologies. The efficacy of interactive, motion capture rehabilitation is not known. Aim: Compare physical function changes after usual care stroke rehabilitation or rehabilitation using novel interactive, motion capture rehabilitation software and commercially available hardware. Method: Clients in two subacute hospital rehabilitation units were individually randomised to usual care or interactive, motion capture rehabilitation for between eight and forty sessions or discharge. Pre-post and between group differences were analysed for standing balance, arm function, and walking. Outcomes between the units were also compared (intervention supervised by physiotherapist in one unit and rehabilitation assistant in other). Results: Seventy-three clients after stroke (mean 22.1 days) attended mean 14 sessions. Both groups improved on the primary outcome functional reach [usual care mean = 3.3 cm (95% 0.6 to 5.9 cm), intervention mean = 4.1 cm (95% CI 1.3 to 6.8 cm)], box and block test increased [usual care mean = 9.5 (95% CI 6.2 to 12.9), intervention mean = 7.6 (95% CI 4.1 to 11)] and timed up-and-go decreased [usual care mean = −8.4 seconds (95% CI −13 to −3.0), intervention mean = −10.1 seconds (95% CI −16.9 to −3.4)] (all p < 0.04) with no between group differences. Conclusion: Interactive, motion-capture rehabilitation for inpatients after stroke produced similar functional improvements to usual care stroke rehabilitation. Delivery of therapy via interactive, motion capture rehabilitation in different delivery supervision models warrants further investigation.

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