Title

Controlability, information-processing and learning motivation: the moderation of working memory by perceptions of control

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Yeigh, T 2004, 'Controlability, information-processing and learning motivation: the moderation of working memory by perceptions of control', Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 66-86.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0816512200028534

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of perceived controllobility on information processing within the attributional model of learning (Weiner, 1985, 1986). Attributional style was used to identify trait patterns of controllability for 37 university student. Task-relevant feedback was then manipulated to test for differences in working memory function between participants with high versus low levels of trait controllobility. Trait controllability occurred differently for hi-trait and lo-trait types. Results supported the hypothesis that it exerts a moderating effect on the way task-relevant feedback is processed. This selective encoding of information appeared to involve limitations inherent to the working memory system that affect processing efficiency, marking an important consideration for the way in which information is presented during the learning process.

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