Title

High zinc exposure leads to reduced dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) levels in both the host and endosymbionts of the reef-building coral Acropora aspera

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Deschaseaux, E, Hardefeldt, J, Graham, J & Reichelt-Brushett, A 2018, 'High zinc exposure leads to reduced dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) levels in both the host and endosymbionts of the reef-building coral Acropora aspera', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol 126, pp. 93-100.

Published version available from:

https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.10.070

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a biogenic compound that could be involved in metal detoxification in both the host and endosymbionts of symbiotic corals. Acropora aspera, a common reef-building coral of the Great Barrier Reef, was exposed to zinc doses from 10 to 1000μg/L over 96h, with zinc being a low-toxic trace metal commonly used in the shipping industry. Over time, significantly lower DMSP concentrations relative to the control were found in both the host and symbionts in the highest zinc treatment where zinc uptake by both partners of the symbiosis was the highest. This clearly indicates that DMSP was consumed or stopped being produced under high and extended zinc exposure. This drop in DMSP was first observed in the host tissue, suggesting that the coral host was the first to respond to metal contamination. Such decrease in DMSP concentrations could influence the long-term health of corals under zinc exposure.

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