Title

Are methane emissions from mangrove stems a cryptic carbon loss pathway? Insights from a catastrophic forest mortality

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Jeffrey, LC, Reithmaier, G, Sippo, JZ, Johnston, SG, Tait, DR, Harada, Y & Maher, DT 2019, 'Are methane emissions from mangrove stems a cryptic carbon loss pathway? Insights from a catastrophic forest mortality', New Phytologist, vol. 224, no. 1, pp. 146-154.

Published version available from:

https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.15995

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Growing evidence indicates that tree‐stem methane (CH4) emissions may be an important and unaccounted‐for component of local, regional and global carbon (C) budgets. Studies to date have focused on upland and freshwater swamp‐forests; however, no data on tree‐stem fluxes from estuarine species currently exist. Here we provide the first‐ever mangrove tree‐stem CH4 flux measurements from >50 trees (n = 230 measurements), in both standing dead and living forest, from a region suffering a recent large‐scale climate‐driven dieback event (Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia). Average CH4 emissions from standing dead mangrove tree‐stems was 249.2 ± 41.0 μmol m−2 d−1 and was eight‐fold higher than from living mangrove tree‐stems (37.5 ± 5.8 μmol m−2 d−1). The average CH4 flux from tree‐stem bases (c. 10 cm aboveground) was 1071.1 ± 210.4 and 96.8 ± 27.7 μmol m−2 d−1 from dead and living stands respectively. Sediment CH4 fluxes and redox potentials did not differ significantly between living and dead stands. Our results suggest both dead and living tree‐stems act as CH4 conduits to the atmosphere, bypassing potential sedimentary oxidation processes. Although large uncertainties exist when upscaling data from small‐scale temporal measurements, we estimated that dead mangrove tree‐stem emissions may account for c. 26% of the net ecosystem CH4 flux.

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