Title

Face validity and reliability of a pictorial instrument for assessing fundamental movement skill perceived competence in young children

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Barnett, LM, Ridgers, ND, Zask, A & Salmon, J 2015, 'Face validity and reliability of a pictorial instrument for assessing fundamental movement skill perceived competence in young children', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 98-102.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2013.12.004

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Objective: To determine reliability and face validity of an instrument to assess young children's perceived fundamental movement skill competence. Design: Validation and reliability study. Methods: A pictorial instrument based on the Test Gross Motor Development-2 assessed perceived locomotor (six skills) and object control (six skills) competence using the format and item structure from the physical competence subscale of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Acceptance for Young Children. Sample 1 completed object control items in May (n = 32) and locomotor items in October 2012 (n = 23) at two time points seven days apart. Children were asked at the end of the test–retest their understanding of what was happening in each picture to determine face validity. Sample 2 (n = 58) completed 12 items in November 2012 on a single occasion to test internal reliability only. Results: Sample 1 children were aged 5–7 years (M = 6.0, SD = 0.8) at object control assessment and 5–8 years at locomotor assessment (M = 6.5, SD = 0.9). Sample 2 children were aged 6–8 years (M = 7.2, SD = 0.73). Intra-class correlations assessed in Sample 1 children were excellent for object control (intra-class correlation = 0.78), locomotor (intra-class correlation = 0.82) and all 12 skills (intra-class correlations = 0.83). Face validity was acceptable. Internal consistency was adequate in both samples for each subscale and all 12 skills (alpha range 0.60–0.81). Conclusions: This study has provided preliminary evidence for instrument reliability and face validity. This enables future alignment between the measurement of perceived and actual fundamental movement skill competence in young children.