Title

Pronurturance Plus at birth: a risk reduction strategy for preventing postpartum haemorrhage

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Saxton, A, Fahy, K & Hastie, C 2016, 'Pronurturance Plus at birth: a risk reduction strategy for preventing postpartum haemorrhage', Women and Birth, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 279-284.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2015.11.007

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) rates continue to rise in the developed world. A recent study found that any skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding within 30 min of birth was associated with an almost 50% reduction in PPH rates. Improved oxytocin release is the biological reason proposed to explain this. The combination of skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding within 30 min of birth is termed ‘Pronurturance’. Midwifery theory and research claims that optimal third stage care is more holistic than simple Pronurturnace which suggests that further reductions in PPH rates may be possible. Question: What can midwives and women do to minimise blood loss in the third and fourth stages of labour? Method: We present a new theory that describes and explains how to optimise the woman's reproductive psychophysiology in the third and fourth stages of labour to ensure a well contracted uterus which inhibits excessive bleeding regardless of risk status or whether active management was used. In developing the Pronurturance Plus theory we expand upon what is already known about oxytocin in relation to simple pronurturance to integrate concepts from birth territory theory, cognitive neuroscience, mindfulness psychology and the autonomic nervous system to develop an holistic understanding of how to optimise care and minimise PPH. Conclusion: Pronurturance Plus is a psycho-biologically grounded theory which is consistent with existing evidence. It is free, natural and socially desirable.