Title

Health service provision and the use of pressure-redistributing devices: mixed methods study of community dwelling individuals with pressure injuries

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Jackson, D, Durrant, L, Bishop, E, Walthall, H, Betteridge, R, Gardner, S, Coulton, W, Hutchinson, M, Neville, S, Davison, PM & Usher, K 2017, 'Health service provision and the use of pressure-redistributing devices: mixed methods study of community dwelling individuals with pressure injuries', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 53, no. 3, pp. 378-389.

Published version available from:

https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10376178.2017.1364973

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Background: Health care within the home setting is a vital and growing component of pressure injury (PI) prevention and management.
Objectives: To describe the use of health services and pressure-redistributing devices in community dwelling patients with PI’s.
Design: Mixed-methods collective case study of a defined, diverse geographic postcode area in the United Kingdom.
Methods: Quantitative retrospective analysis of electronic and paper medical records of adult PI patients from 2015 district nursing reports. Qualitative semi-structured interviews of community dwelling adult patients receiving, or received, treatment for PI in 2016.
Results: Mandatory reports (n = 103) revealed that 90 patients were supplied with a variety of pressure-redistributing devices but only one-third of patients used the equipment as recommended. Qualitative interviews (n = 12), reported to COREQ guidelines, revealed that patients felt reliant on community health services, and were concerned about the consistency of their care.
Conclusions: Authentic patient involvement is required to provide care and interventions that are acceptable to PI patients and can be incorporated into self-care strategies and effectively monitored.