Title

The use of emotional intelligence capabilities in clinical reasoning and decision-making: a qualitative, exploratory study

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Hutchinson, M, Hurley, J, Kozlowski, D & Whitehair, L 2017, 'The use of emotional intelligence capabilities in clinical reasoning and decision-making: a qualitative, exploratory study', Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 27, no. 3-4, pp. e600-e610.

Published version available from:

http:/dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14106

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To explore clinical nurses’ experiences of using emotional intelligence capabilities during clinical reasoning and decision-making. Background: There has been little research exploring whether, or how, nurses employ emotional intelligence (EI) in clinical reasoning and decision-making. Design: Qualitative phase of a larger mixed-methods study. Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of regis- tered nurses (n = 12) following EI training and coaching. Constructivist thematic analysis was employed to analyse the narrative transcripts. Results: Three themes emerged: the sensibility to engage EI capabilities in clinical contexts, motivation to actively engage with emotions in clinical decision-making and incorporating emotional and technical perspectives in decision-making. Conclusion: Continuing to separate cognition and emotion in research, theorising and scholarship on clinical reasoning is counterproductive. Relevance to clinical practice: Understanding more about nurses’ use of EI has the potential to improve the calibre of decisions, and the safety and quality of care delivered.

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