Title

The chiropractic vertebral subluxation part 2: the earliest subluxation theories from 1902 to 1907

Document Type

Article

Publication details

Senzon, SA 2018, 'The chiropractic vertebral subluxation part 2: the earliest subluxation theories from 1902 to 1907', Journal of Chiropractic Humanities, vol. 25, pp. 22-35.

Published version available from:

https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.echu.2018.10.009

Peer Reviewed

Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the history of chiropractic vertebral subluxation (CVS) in the chiropractic profession between the years 1897 and 1907.
Discussion: The first theories in chiropractic were developed by pioneers such as D. D. Palmer; his students, such as A. P. Davis, Oakley Smith, and Solon Langworthy; and his son B. J. Palmer. Their thoughts on CVS established foundational theories for the profession. D. D. Palmer posited his initial concept of CVS as an articular disrelationship between vertebrae causing pressure and impingement on nerves leading to too much or too little function. Palmer's students developed additional theories.
Conclusion: From the first years of CVS, there was a diversity of theories, practices, and scientific rationale. This account of the early theories may offer insights into the historical literature.

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